Short copper tumbler, vi Makr

Short copper tumbler, vi Makr

handcraftedbyfrederickscanlen:

Busy Busy . I will list some more neck knives in my online store this month ready for Father’s Day . Please email me at scanlen@gmail.com if you have any questions  or special requests . Scanlen Knives would also like to thank everyone again for the overwhelming support .  Happy cutting :-)

handcraftedbyfrederickscanlen:

Busy Busy . I will list some more neck knives in my online store this month ready for Father’s Day . Please email me at scanlen@gmail.com if you have any questions or special requests . Scanlen Knives would also like to thank everyone again for the overwhelming support . Happy cutting :-)

handcraftedbyfrederickscanlen:

Black Ebony neck knife available in my online store now .

handcraftedbyfrederickscanlen:

Black Ebony neck knife available in my online store now .

troybungartpotter:

Add the finial touch to a platter with a sweeping curve or just stare at it because it is too beautiful to use, it’s your choice. Both options have their own rewards, although very different results.

Curves

wintercroft:

Handmade Sitka spruce box.

I’ve been making these boxes for a couple of years now. I make them using only traditional tools and techniques and they are influenced by the style and techniques of both European and Japanese traditional wooden boxes. I use them mostly as a bento style lunch box but they are also ideal for general storage. They are great for storing dry foods like rice or flour, your favourite Puerh tea, pottery tools, tea utensils or jewellery.

you can read more about the process involved in making the boxes here: http://wintercroft.co.uk/

i also have a couple for sale through my Etsy shop https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/Wintercroft?ref=si_shop

thanks for reading

designbinge:

Folklore - wooden Spinning Tops

designbinge:

Folklore - wooden Spinning Tops

(via saratoutsuwato)

mudbugcreations:

stormphyre:

troybungartpotter:

This highly figured bocote pottery rib fires up my imagination. Its dramatic contrasting grain pattern wraps around the surface as if they were painted.

You can find more of my pottery tools at my Etsy store Throwing Curves.

ohman. 

I wants the thing please thanks k bai

(via fierybeards)

archiemcphee:

These intricate and extraordinarily beautiful embroidered silk balls are a form of Japanese folk art called Temari, which means “hand ball” in Japanese. These particular temari are even more impressive because they were handmade by a 92-year-old grandmother in Japan.

"Although she only learned this elaborate skill in her sixties, she has since created nearly 500 unique designs that have been photographed by her granddaughter NanaAkua. Impressive does not even begin to describe this feat of dexterity, imagination and keen eyesight. The difficult process of becoming a recognized temari craftsman in Japan is tedious and requires specific training and testing. This grandmother must certainly be one motivated and talented woman. And if that was not enough to garner your complete admiration, she now volunteers every week teaching others how to make their own temari.”

Temari have been made in Japan since the 7th century and are still highly valued and cherished as gifts symbolizing deep friendship and loyalty. They are traditionally given to children by their parents on New Year’s Day. Mothers place a small piece of paper with a secret goodwill wish for her child inside the tightly-wrapped ball. Alternately, some temari are made as noisemakers by placing rice grains or bells in the center.

Visit My Modern Metropolis to view more of NanaAkua’s photos of her grandmother’s beautiful handiwork and learn more about this stunning Japanese holiday tradition.

(via midorikai-musings)

(Source: handcraftedbyfrederickscanlen)